Crain's: Man who received ALS stem cell transplant still doing well

Ted Harada, a 40-year-old man diagnosed with ALS, who received stem cell implantations to his spinal cord in two separate surgeries as part of the first-ever FDA-approved trial of a stem cell therapy for ALS, talked last week with Crain's Detroit business reporter Tom Henderson.  Harada said he's still feeling the positive effects he attributes to his second surgery, which took place last August. 

"I've been doing great and feeling great." Harada told Henderson. "Just now, the left leg showed a little bit of weakness returning, but I'm still so much better than I was before the surgeries. It's the first time, since August, they've noticed any slight weakness.

"It's clear from the data that the injections reversed my symptoms and slowed down the progression of the disease. I've received a blessing. I almost forget I have ALS. I don't have the constant reminder of having to use the canes. Now, I don't think about ALS every day. Every couple of days something happens and I think, `Oh, yeah, I have ALS.' "

Taubman Institute Director Dr. Eva Feldman received FDA approval in April to move the trial to Phase II, which will study efficacy as well as safety.  Patient recruitment has not yet started for that phase of the trial. 

Click here to read the entire Crain's blog post.

 


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