Research by Taubman Scholar Dr. Arul Chinnaiyan leads to new early test for prostate cancer

U-M offers new early detection test for prostate cancer

Mi-Prostate Score test improves on PSA for predicting cancer

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — More than 1 million men will undergo a prostate biopsy this year, but only about one-fifth of those biopsies will result in a cancer diagnosis.

The reason is that the traditional prostate cancer screening test – a blood test to measure prostate specific antigen, or PSA – does not give doctors a complete picture.

Now, the University of Michigan Health System has begun offering a new urine test called Mi-Prostate Score to improve on PSA screening for prostate cancer. The test incorporates three specific markers that could indicate cancer and studies have shown that the combination is far more accurate than PSA alone.

“Many more men have elevated PSA than actually have cancer but it can be difficult to determine this without biopsy. We need new tools to help patients and doctors make better decisions about what to do if serum PSA is elevated. Mi-Prostate Score helps with this,” says Scott Tomlins, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of pathology and urology at the University of Michigan.

Researchers validated the new test on nearly 2,000 urine samples. Mi-Prostate Score, or MiPS, was significantly more accurate than PSA alone for predicting cancer as well as predicting aggressive prostate cancer that is likely to grow and spread quickly.

Mi-Prostate Score developed from a discovery in the lab of Arul Chinnaiyan, M.D., Ph.D., in 2005 of a genetic anomaly that occurs in about half of all prostate cancers, an instance of two genes changing places and fusing together.

This gene fusion, T2:ERG, is believed to cause prostate cancer. Studies in prostate tissues show that the gene fusion almost always indicates cancer. 

The new urine test looks for the T2:ERG fusion as well as another marker, PCA3. This is combined with serum PSA measure to produce a risk assessment for prostate cancer. The test also predicts risk for having an aggressive tumor, helping doctors and patients make decisions about whether to wait and monitor test levels or pursue immediate biopsy.

“This combination test is not designed to say definitively at diagnosis whether a man has aggressive prostate cancer, but it can provide a more accurate estimate of the likelihood of having cancer and the likelihood of that cancer being aggressive,” Tomlins says.

The test is available to anyone but requires a request from a doctor. For further information, call the University of Michigan’s MLabs at 800-862-7284.

Prostate cancer statistics: 238,590 Americans will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year and 29,720 will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society

Disclosure: The University of Michigan has been issued a patent on the detection of ETS gene fusions in prostate cancer, on which Tomlins and Chinnaiyan are listed as co-inventors. The diagnostic field of use has been licensed to Hologic. Chinnaiyan has served as a consultant to Hologic. 

Source: The University of MIchigan Health System

 


Help Us Make A Difference. Make A Donation That Could Save Lives.

Make A Gift

Connect/
Share/
follow/

Follow Us / Friend Us

Discovery-driven research that matters

phallodin

Taubman Scholar Dr. Charles Burant tests promising diabetes drug

TAK-875, a new treatment for type 2 diabetes, improves blood sugar control and is equally effective as glimepiride, but has a significantly lower risk of creating a dangerous drop in blood sugar, called hypoglycemia, according to a new study.

Read more

Taubman Institute leaders make the case for more doctor-scientist funding

 

The prestigious "Academic Medicine" journal has just published a new article authored by Taubman Institute senior management and Detroit-area attorney Scott Roberts.

The article explores the problematic gap between bench research and clinical application of new treatments or cures. 

Read more


Help Us Make A Difference. Make A Gift.

Leaders from the realms of business, academia and the community help to refine the Taubman Institute's vision, to monitor progress and to provide support, advice and counsel.

Meet the Leadership Advisory Board

Meet the Scientific Advisory Board

About Taubman Institute Video

In this video feature, Taubman Scholars explain why funding for high-risk research is so important to their work and to the discovery of promising cures and treatments.  

 

Stem cell surgery targets ALS Video

Patients glean hope from trial’s progress but wish it were faster

 

video-emerging-scholars-programDonors pitch in to keep brilliant science minds at U-M Video

Emerging Scholars program connects promising M.D.-researchers with philanthropists